The Age Of The Eternal Student

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(You can listen to the audio version of this writing on iTunes , Google Play or Stream)

I was a prolific reader when I was a kid. In elementary school, they used to give you these coupons to get pizza if you read required books. You’d sit at what are now considered archaic computers and answer multiple choice questions to prove you know it. When all is finished, you’d have a button and coupon for a pan pizza. I would have read them without the pizza but, incentive via pan crust? C’mon.

At that age, I started having trouble with getting my letters confused and my hands would get tired when writing. I’d leave words out of sentences. I had a problem with pronouncing things, remember names and dates. It wasn’t anything on the level of needing special help. I was still an AG student and did the best I could but I’d have problems with phonics, and certain things took me away from the A+ life.

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On My Best Night, I’m Still The Ugliest One

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(You can listen to the audio version of this writing on iTunes or Google Play)

It’s beyond important you understand the clanking of glasses at of the end of the night, the rustling in desperation in hopes to fulfill a void, are not sounds I’m overly familiar with. This is not an expose’ on the plight of being unattractive you might expect. It’s not as if I’m the first unattractive person to share the struggles of being genetically challenged.

I write this tale with the inspiration of knowing, male or female, that being the ugliest one in the group doesn’t mean you can’t achieve the ultimate of human connection and intimacy. You do not have to accept a life of settling becoming your imminent future.

When I was seven years old, I put my school book bag on my both my shoulders and had it sit plumb in the middle of my back as backpacks were made to do. I walked to the bus stop near my house, and it was an extra frigid morning you could barely muster getting out of bed, but now blinking orange lights were something you prayed to see. My older brother came over to me and told me I was wearing my backpack wrong. He grabbed it, tossed it over my right shoulder with both straps on the same side and said, “There, that’s better.”

My brother was the quintessential All-American baseball star. The guy the girls wanted to date. When he was 12 he dated a 15 year old girl. He somehow pulled it all off while growing up on the wrong side of the tracks. Like most movies and novels that focus on the underdog, we lived on the wrong side of the tracks. Our tracks were less defined than the ones you see in John Hughes’ films or S.E. Hinton narratives of the Midwest, but they were there. They circled through from gas station to corner store and when you went past a certain section of town, sans a few isolated streets, you were indubitably on the wrong side. More

You Need To Hear This Podcast – Is Live!

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There is a lot to cover and I have a tendency to be tl;dr, so here is the condensed version.

Where Can I Download The Show?

For those of you who would like to help, my podcast would benefit the most from being downloaded and reviewed through iTunes. My goal is to be featured in the New & Noteworthy  section in the iTunes Store. In short, the more downloads I get in a short period of time, the more of a shot I have to make the list. It’s not a guarantee, but you’d be helping my chances.

I care very much about the ethics of reviews so I’ll simply say if you like what you hear and it helps you, it would be great if you could leave a few words. I’d appreciate it.

1. Most Appreciated Download Option:
Download You Need To Hear This  Through iTunes 

2.  Google Play. 

3. Stream Through My Blog

What Is The purpose of You Need To Hear This?

I wanted to change the atmosphere of what you normally hear on lifestyle design podcasts and do something different. The majority of people who teach and educate on becoming a fitter person or “happier” person, often miss out on the actual research and critical thought it takes to be knowledgeable on these subjects. What we often end up having are marketers masquerading as experts. I’m all for being successful but not at the cost of the information. Too often, the people who have something to say aren’t on the platform or audience level desired. We are certainly seeing this play out throughout this recent political cycle.

What makes us happy? What defines success for each of us? More

A Response To The New York Times Biggest Loser Study

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My feed and inbox were inundated with concerns about the “Biggest Loser” article published by The New York Times. On one hand, I think it’s great people are paying attention to the complexities of obesity and weight loss. On the other hand, I think there were a lot of problems and missing variables in the analysis of the study presented in the article. The result created a “gloom and doom” picture for people who are obese. It also puts the focus on resting metabolic rate (RMR) alone which as we see in research is not the only piece to this complex puzzle.

Obesity is Not a Blanket Term

The first thing most people did with this study is associate it with themselves. They worried (rightfully so) what this means for them. “Can I ever lose weight?” “Will I have to starve for the rest of my life?” “I was already scared I can’t do this, what now?”

We speak of obesity much like cancer. The truth is the root of why someone is obese (arguably rated as someone with a BMI >30) is as varied as human beings. There is no one road to excess growth in body fat nor is there one to losing it. Some would say (myself included) it is as simple as caloric surplus and deficit, but it is far more complex.

There is also a difference between obesity developed in childhood versus adulthood. For example, if you’re morbidly obese with family history it’s very different than becoming slightly obese later as an adult.

In short, reading the Biggest Loser study and thinking it directly applies to you or fearing poor results makes as much sense as thinking you’re going to get cancer because someone your age, somewhere, has cancer.

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On William Banting’s Diet, Taubes, And Anecdotal Weight Loss

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Gary Taubes bestselling book, “Good Calories, Bad Calories” starts off with the story of William Banting. Banting’s tale is highlighted in his late 1800’s release titled “Letter on Corpulence, Addressed to the Public. ” It started as a pamphlet and turned in a best-selling book with multiple editions. In the low carb community, Banting has been proclaimed as one of the first low carb gurus. He is cited often in works ranging from Taubes to Atkins.

Taubes writes,

WILLIAM BANTING WAS A FAT MAN. In 1862, at age sixty-six, the five-foot-five Banting, or “Mr. Banting of corpulence notoriety,” as the British Medical Journal would later call him, weighed in at over two hundred pounds…Banting was recently retired from his job as an upscale London undertaker; he had no family history of obesity, nor did he consider himself either lazy, inactive, or given to excessive indulgence at the table. Nonetheless, corpulence had crept up on him in his thirties, as with many of us today, despite his best efforts. He took up daily rowing and gained muscular vigor, a prodigious appetite, and yet more weight. He cut back on calories, which failed to induce weight loss but did leave him exhausted and beset by boils. He tried walking, riding horseback, and manual labor. His weight increased.” – From “Good Calories, Bad Calories

It would seem that Banting had “tried it all.” I want you to pay particular attention to the statement, “He cut back on calories, which failed to induce weight loss” for future reference points. Without fail Banting failed at dieting. He gave every bit he had to give, but the bulge wouldn’t budge. A frustrated Banting met up with a man named William Harvey, an aural surgeon. More

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